Thursday, February 28, 2008

Syncretia - A fictional world in subtle hues that throbs with the narrative

I am tired of constraints imposed by time zones. I crave hours with the creator of a microcosm that exists only in Second Life.

Alpha Auer's (aka Elif Ayiter) stand-out world at Syncretia (teleport directly from here) is ghostly and architectural. Seeping through its monochromatic palette are moments of tension or humor or serenity, but the predominant take-away is that this is a place where many layers of civilization co-exist, making room for or overlapping each other in an orderly way, until (sh*t)/Life happens... disrupting the harmony... and all those carefully laid-out designs and plans are faced with discordant elements. Nothing is as it would be in Real Life, but this space and its existence feel tangible.

Syncretia - branches and plane



Alpha's range of colors is purposefully narrow, but not bleak. It is a temptation in Windlight, which I succumbed to.



Syncretia

Alpha's human, Elif Ayiter, is a Turkish artist, designer and educator specialising in the development of hybrid educational methodologies between art & design and computer science. Her Flickr stream further explains the evolution of this quiet masterpiece.

1 comments:

alphaauer said...

Thanks Bett!!!

I am glad you picked up on the humor. I am very much of a tongue-in-cheek sort of person, so I am really very glad that it is coming through in what I do. And also that there are traces of mishaps (hhh) and stuff left lying around, and so on - I am glad you noticed all that too. I do not want this place to be a sterile "art" environment at all: I love to see all the traces of Hack, wolfie and Mosmax around the place...

Syncretia is not going to be around forever in this way at all: Eventually, in a year or so at the latest, it will all get torn down and rebuilt as an art educational environment, which will be part of my PhD research. People interested in what that is all about can download the, admittedly somewhat hefty, reading material here:
http://www.citrinitas.com/2008/sl-research.htm